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Experienced grief counselor publishes book on grief and loss
2010-12-09
 

Tears in a Bottle: Stories of Life and Loss by Clair H. Jantzen (MA, 1985)

Finally, a readable book on grief and loss in the first person! Too many books about the death of a loved one are lengthy or instructional. Here is a delightful companion for the bereaved individual, something to pick up and put down to digest in small mouthfuls, to read in minutes instead of hours. Tears in a Bottle contains the stories of real people (names and circumstances changed to protect the suffering, of course).

“After more than 30 years of walking with hurting people,” author Clair Jantzen states, “I began to see that grieving people didn’t want to read about grief. They wanted to know that they weren’t alone. They want to connect with someone who’s been there. It doesn’t have to be exactly like their experience, but they want to know that someone has walked, or is even now walking, where they are walking, on a lonely road with lots of bumps, experiencing something that appears to have a mind of its own and seems to sneak up on them at the most inopportune times and to shake them to the core all over again.”

In his insightful forward, Dr. Ken Doka (Professor of Gerontology at The College of New Rochelle, New York, and Senior Consultant to the Hospice Foundation of America) says, “There is value to stories – to our narratives of grief. The experience of grief can be very isolating. In my years as a counselor, researcher, and writer about grief, I often have found that people have two possible theories of grief – explicit and implicit theories. The implicit theory is that each day after a loss, our grief ebbs a bit. We become a bit stronger; grief becomes a little more manageable. Others might have a more explicit theory of grief – perhaps building on a stage theory of grief – thinking that grief is predictable. We go through a series of stages in a predetermined amount of time – ultimately learning to accept our loss, forget what is past, and move on with our lives.

Yet, these models flounder when we truly experience loss. We find far more chaotic, far more individual, far more unpredictable than we imagined. We are beset by buzzing emotions. Our loss affects us on all levels – physically and spiritually, form the ways we think to how we behave.

That is the value of stories. This is the value Clair Jantzen’s Tears in a Bottle. For here we hear the real stories of people who are grieving. And these individual narratives have power.”

Clair Jantzen has a Master of Arts in Counseling and has been in practice for over 30 years. He lives with his wife, Rachel, of 25 years, and their son in Kelowna, British Columbia, Canada. They also have one married daughter. He is currently a grief counselor and funeral celebrant in a funeral home where he also facilitates grief support care. An accomplished public speaker, Clair addresses business, community and church groups on grief and loss issues, caring for the dying and other counseling topics. He is a Registered Professional Counselor, a member of the Canadian Professional Counselors Association and is the author of Living with Grief, Children and Adolescents: The Value of the Funeral Service and Viewing.

For more information contact:
Clair H. Jantzen
(250) 860-1998
info@clairjantzen.ca
To order, visit Clair's website.

 
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